Make your own free website on Tripod.com
Page#

  1. 1933 Dr. Zworykin Image

  2. 1933 RCA Test Image

  3. 1933 Zoo Image

  4. 1933 Movie Image

  5. 1933 Baseball & Football Images

  6. 1933 Piano Player Image

  7. 1933 Top;Elmer Engstrom Bottom; Image of Woman

  8. 1933 Movie Image

  9. 1933 Mickey Mouse Image

  10. 1933 Merrill Trainer Image

  11. 1933 Franklin Bridge & antenna images

  12. 1933 Unknown image

  13. 1933 top; unknown, Bottom; Zworykin

  14. 1933 Ship Image

  15. 1932 Aug. Eclipse Images, Right G. Ogloblinsky

  16. 1937 Top; Dr. Engstrom

  17. Click here to see 1937 Top; An Early Main Television Signal Room Control and Switching Panel, Lesley E. Flory at left, Charles Banca to his right. Studio and Motion Picture Image Selection as well as Audio are made and forwarded to the Radio Transmitter. Note Image on the Screen. Bottom ; Arthur W. Vance, an expert in electric circuitry, pictured to the right.

  18. Click here to see 1937 Top; Charles J. Young, son of Owen D. Young, first Chairman of RCA. Bottom; Probably Elmer Engstrom.

  19. Click here to see 1936 Top; Listening to the Sound Transmission of Television. Bottom; Art Vance.

  20. Click here to see 1937 Top; Bob Goodrich on left inspects a Y-Shaped Image Intensifier Tube connected to a vacuum pump system and baking oven. Insuring that there are no leaks it is then throughly outgassed by baking the tube. The metal in the tube is also heated at a high temperature with a high frequency bombarder.

  21. Click here to see 1937 Left; Earnest Massa (brother of the better known Frank Massa). Right; Dr. George Morton. Bottom; Mary Hemphill, Secretary.

  22. Click here to see 1934 Close-up Screen image of a Piano Player.

  23. Click here to see 1934 Close-up Screen image of a Piano Player.

  24. Click here to see 1934 Screen Image of a Cartoon

  25. Click here to see 1934 Screen Image of a Piano Player

  26. Click here to see 1934 Earliest Known Unpublished Baseball Television Screen Image

  27. Click here to see 1934 David Sarnoff makes his TV debut

  28. Click here to see 1934 Top; Dr. Zworykin at his desk at Camden, N.J. Bottom; Gregory N. Ogloblinsky, Russian by birth, was formerly Edouard Belin's chief engineer in Paris, France in the late 1920's.

  29. Click here to see 1934 Top; Dr. Zworykin at his desk Bottom; Gregory N. Ogloblinsky, physicist and engineer, at his desk, RCA in Camden, N.J. "Oglo" was instrumental in the development of the Iconoscope (Camera) Tube. He was killed in a high-speed automobile crash while vacationing in France, in 1934.

  30. Click here to see 1934 Left; Gregory N. Ogloblinsky at work. Right; Dr. Zworykin Reading at his desk at RCA in Camden, N.J.

  31. Click here to see 1934 Top; Gregory N. Ogloblinsky at work on one of the handmade components for experimental television at RCA in Camden, N.J.

  32. Click here to see 1934 Dr. Zworykin being broadcast by his Iconoscope

  33. Click here to see 1934 H. W. Laverenz, Chemist.

  34. Click here to see 1934 The First Iconoscope Television Camera in the Studio aimed at Lesley E. Florey.

  35. Click here to see 1934 Top; Dick Campbell. Bottom; Bill Painter.

  36. Click here to see 1934 Bottom; Harley Iams inspecting an Early Iconoscope Tube

  37. Click here to see 1934 Making tubes for television. Top; Karl Kesselring, glassblower. Bottom; Karl Schuman, glassblower.

  38. Click here to see 1934 Time to relax after success is achieved and then a time for celebration

  39. Click here to see 1934 A Celebration of the Refinement of a New Era of Communications

  40. Click here to see 1934 Top; Chemicals being stored for their use in experimental television. Bottom; Unknown experimental television equipment.

  41. Click here to see 1934 Top; Raymond Davis Kell, who formerly worked with Dr. E. F. W. Alexanderson at General Electric, is shown scanning film for television with a "Nipkow" type scanning disk and a Powers Cameragraph (model 6B or 6A) with a modified motor drive. This projector would have been considered to be an antique even in the 30's. The film used with this projector would have been made of nitrocelulose and quite flamable; it is interesting that the room in which it is being used does not appear to be a regulation fireproof projection booth as required by law. A second lens was placed behind the film to focus on the photo electric pickup tube for satisfactory results. The light source shown is from a Edison-Mazda lamp, gas filled and quite bright. Bottom; The First Iconoscope Camera Transmitting a Test Pattern (see page 2 above to view the actual screen image).

  42. Click here to see 1934 Dr. Zworykin at his desk at RCA

  43. Click here to see 1934 Gregory N. Ogloblinsky working on a project.

  44. Click here to see 1934 H. W. Laverenz, Chemist.

  45. Click here to see 1934 Harley Iams, at his desk.

  46. Click here to see 1934; Unknown assistant, is spot welding the metal components that go inside a vacuum tube. This spot welder is known as an "impulse welder".

  47. Yet Unknown Image Please help

  48. Yet Unknown Image Please help

  49. Click here to see 1934 Top; Arthur Vance. Bottom; Unknown assistant works on television project at RCA in Camden, N.J.

  50. Click here to see 1932, August, Dr. Zworykin (at right) and Unknown Assistants Ready the Iconoscope with Lens and Mirror to Capture a Solar Eclipse

  51. Click here to see 1934 Right; Kinescope (TV Picture) Tubes of Various Sizes on Display

  52. Click here to see 1935 Dr. Zworykin lectures to a group in Berlin, Germany, probably at Technische Hochschule in Charlottenburg.

  53. Click here to see 1935 Dr. Zworykin in Berlin, Germany, probably at Technische Hochschule in Charlottenburg, where he had enrolled as a student 22 years earlier.

  54. Click here to see November, 1940; A Gathering at Rodman Smith's Farm. According to Les Flory, "Rodman Smith was a friend of Dr. Zworykin, not associated with him in his work. I believe they were members of a flying club."

  55. Click here to see November, 1940; A Gathering at Rodman Smith's Farm

  56. Click here to see November, 1940; A Gathering at Rodman Smith's Farm

  57. Click here to see 1940 Camden, N.J., Top; Dr. Edward G. Ramberg, physicist: his papers have been deposited at the American Philosophical Society in Philadelphia. With him is Dr. James Hillier (b.1915), his work on the electron microscope began at the University of Toronto. He and a fellow graduate student built a working model in 1937 that magnified 7,000 times. Modern Electron Microscopes can magnify up 2 million times. Dr. Hillier was a research engineer at RCA Laboratories from 1940 to 1953, at which time he joined Melpar Inc. as research director. He returned to RCA in 1954, where he became the general manager (1957) of laboratories in Princeton, New Jersey. He retired in 1978, as Executive Vice President and Senior Scientist of RCA Labratories. Dr. Hillier holds 40 patents. Bottom; Dr. George A. Morton, co-inventor of the first commercial electron microscope.

  58. Click here to see 1940 Top Left; Dr. Ladislas Marton and Golzaff, in front of the Electron Microscope. Dr. Marton preceeded James Hillier in studying the Electron Microscope. Top Right; Earnest Massa, an expert on Electro-acoustics who started working at Victor Talking Machine Co in the late 1920's and Robert R. Goodrich view the top of the first Commercial RCA Television Receiver (TRK-12). Bottom; J.F. Bender, Electron Microscope research engineer. (all of RCA)

  59. Click here to see 1940 Top; Browder J. Thompson (1903-1944), Zworykin's co-director of RCA Laboratories when they opened in Princeton in 1942. Thompson died in Italy, July 4-5, 1944 while evaluating working conditions for radar when the Germans shot down the plane he was in. In Dr. Zworykin's office at RCA the walls did not display any of his some 50 awards, they were bare, except for one thing--this small photograph of B.J. Thompson. Miss Gale is at Top Right. Bottom; Dr. P.T. Smith (at Harrison Facility)

  60. Click here to see 1940 Top; Dr. R. Nelson, Bottom; L. Garner at Harrison, N.J. RCA Facility. Harrison was formerly a Westinghouse tube plant acquired by RCA for the purpose of making research tubes, like the iconoscope ready for manufacture.

  61. Click here to see 1940 Top; H. Floss, Bottom; Harley Iams ,at Harrison, N.J. RCA Facility. Started out as a student engineer at Westinghouse to work on phototelegraphy (facsilile machines). He later became Co-director at HRL Labs"

  62. Click here to see 1943 Camden, N.J.; Dr. V.K. Zworykin (seated left, co-inventor), Dr. James Hillier,(seated right, co-inventor) and Perry C. Smith (standing, RCA Victor Design Engineer)display Electron Microscope, in console desk size which is capeable of magnifying up to 100,000 times.